’90s Decor From the AD Archive That Stands the Test of Time


The ’90s proclivity for simplicity suited this Nevada home by architect Mark Mack, from AD’s December 1995 issue. Interior designer Terry Hunziker kept the palette neutral to extend the desert’s relaxed energy, which was on generous view via the home’s many windows. A painting by Jean Dubuffet hung above a console table designed by Hunziker, with artwork by Deborah Butterfield and Donald Judd displayed nearby.

1997: Buttery yellow in a Hudson Valley house

Yellow slipcovers and seat cushions complement the blue curtains and tablecloth in the morning room.

Yellow slipcovers and seat cushions complement the blue curtains and tablecloth in the morning room.

Photo: Durston Saylor

The space's lighthearted sense of humour continues into the dining room via checkered chairs and bright sunflowers.

The space’s lighthearted sense of humor continues into the dining room via checkered chairs and bright sunflowers.

Photo: Durston Saylor

A soft yellow was a favored 1990s tone, and designer Greg Jordan leaned into the color for this morning room. Yellow slipcovers and seat cushions complemented the blue curtains and tablecloth to make for a refreshing morning. Jordan and his clients’ aim for the home, featured in the October 1997 issue, was to create a lighthearted space that had a sense of humor, and the light shade was just one of the many tools in their arsenal.

1998: A Philip Johnson abode with some unusual additions

Copper forms provide dramatic contrast against Johnsons Miesian simplicity.

Copper forms provide dramatic contrast against Johnson’s Miesian simplicity.

Photo: Jeff Goldberg

Another interior angle of one of Wedlick's copper additions.

Another interior angle of one of Wedlick’s copper additions

Photo: Jeff Goldberg

When one makes additions to a home by an architectural great, it can be a delicate balance to remain steadfast to the original design intention. Hired to add more square footage to a 1951 Philip Johnson home, Dennis Wedlick defied expectations: Instead of camouflaging new sections of the structure into the old, he added three copper forms that dramatically contrasted against Johnson’s Miesian simplicity. Featured in the February 1998 issue of AD, it’s a design that feels completely in line with the forward-looking spirit of the late ’90s.

1999: A stripe-happy Manhattan apartment

Black and white striped curtains side table cloths wall coverings and bed linens give the rooms an orderliness that...

Black-and-white striped curtains, tablecloths on side tables, wall coverings, and bed linens gave the rooms an orderliness that still felt playful and distinct.

Photo: Durston Saylor

Black and white stripes also pervade in the Hempeldesigned bathroom.

Black-and-white stripes also pervaded the Hempel-designed bathroom.

Photo: Durston Saylor

Geometric patterns were popular in ’90s decor as a whole, including in interiors. This Manhattan apartment designed by Anouska Hempel committed to chic stripes in many of its rooms. Black-and-white striped curtains, table cloths on side tables, wall coverings, and bed linens gave the rooms an orderliness that still felt playful and distinct. “The stripes of other buildings seen from the window inspired me to go linear,” Hempel told AD in the home’s May 1999 feature. “The green of [the Central Park view] is also relevant: Black, white, and green make a statement of non-chaos.”

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